An Interview With Author Carlos Luxul

Regular readers know that I adore books, especially thrillers, and so I was more than pleased to receive a copy of “Ocean Dove” by Carlos Luxul to review. “Ocean Dove” was published on 28th April 2020 and written by Carlos Luxul , who knows his stuff having worked over 30 years in the shipping and global logistics industry. This is a very fast-paced terrorist attack thriller that is made even more terrifying because the scenarios are extremely plausible. I’m not sure if “liked” or “enjoyed” are the right words but it is a great read that kept me riveted – although if this book was a film, I would have been hiding behind the cushion for most of the time! Security services man Dan Brooks came across as being pretty stubborn, yet thorough and again, an entirely believable character. An interview with Carlos himself had to be on the cards….. hi Carlos!

Hi, I’m Carlos! I’m presently a single guy – and ever hopeful … I travel a lot, for work, often spending long periods abroad, sometimes running into years.  It can be rootless and has its downsides but as a career it’s been fascinating. And you do get to see the world and get to know its peoples.

Who or what inspired you to put pen to paper after working over 30 years in the shipping and global logistics industry?

Whenever I have free time I try to get my head in a book – with the exception of the period I was actually writing The Ocean Dove. And like so many other keen readers, I had always promised myself that I would have a go one day, and then a lull between work contracts gave me the opportunity to sit down without distraction and actually start. 

“Ocean Dove” was published on 28 April 2020 – and what a thriller – I enjoyed reading the book from start to finish.  Actually, I don’t know if “liked” is the right word but it was a great read that kept me riveted. All the characters were very believable.. From security services man Dan Brooks, his wife, his colleagues, the terrorists. So, which character did you enjoy writing about the most?  Which character was the hardest?

The character I most enjoyed writing was Dan Brooks, the story’s protagonist. He’s the leading player, so I had to work the hardest on him, to make him real and relatable. So I guess the most satisfaction and enjoyment came from putting flesh to Dan. 

The hardest were definitely the terrorists. They also had to be real, and we have to face up to the fact that terrorists are real people. Sure, we don’t like them and we don’t understand them. Firstly, we don’t understand them as people. Secondly, we don’t understand why they’ve chosen that life-path, or is it death-path? But somehow I felt compelled that readers should be able to understand them on important levels, to see them as both human and terrorists. I also felt I had to show what drove them, what was underlying, what societal experiences had shaped their transformation from one of us to one of them. I also thought it important to show their fundamentals, as wholly flawed people, particularly the leaders, and bring their sociopathic and narcissistic cores to the fore. And then to take it further by splitting the various characters into their related groups – the cold loner sociopath, the superficially charming narcissist, and the simply lost and misguided souls. Psychological studies of terrorists usually break them down into these principal types, with the addition of underlying insecurity and anger issues.

Were there any aspects of writing the thriller that surprised you, pleasantly or otherwise?

The aspect that surprised me most was being able to conjure up in my own mind the shocking things that some of the characters do. A secondary surprise was counteracting that with what I hope will be seen as humanity in other aspects of the book and in other characters.

What made you decide to write “The Ocean Dove”?   Did your own personal opinions and thoughts about the subject material change as the thriller developed?

The inspiration for the plot had been in the back of my mind for a while. It came from time spent in ports around the world, and realising how vulnerable they were – if someone had malign intentions. Historically, cities started with a port, and a city grew around it. Over time, some of these ports outgrew their host city and moved ten or twenty miles along the coast. But many major ports are still operating cheek by jowl with urban centres. They are a back door to a city, and too often a poorly guarded back door. This was the kernel of the idea  and it developed from there. So I had a pretty clear idea of the who, what and how, and I don’t think I had to adjust my opinion or focus too much when it came to the plot. But from the character side of it, the motivation and so on, that certainly evolved the deeper I got into it. 

Are there any new thriller ideas or writing plans in the pipeline?

Yes, I definitely want to write more. The Ocean Dove is a complete story in itself with a proper conclusion. But it does lend itself to a sequel, so … And I think there’s mileage in Dan Brooks as a character as well, so I would like to see him again. 

copyright © Linda Hobden

Are you a bookworm? What is your favourite genre and/or authors? Kindle or actual book? 

I read both fiction and non-fiction. For personal pleasure I enjoy travel and travellers’ accounts and memoirs, with a dash of history. These are non-fiction. For fiction, I like thrillers, espionage and mystery, and this ranges from the masters like Conrad, Christie, Hammett and Chandler, through Le Carre to Cornwell, Clancy and Leonard, and beyond to Brown and Child. I’ve a soft spot for Charles McCarry, who’s sadly overlooked, and I don’t know why. How do I read? Well, I can see the attraction and practicality of a kindle, but for me it’s got to be a physical book in my hands. 

Is “The Ocean Dove” available to purchase worldwide?

Yes, The Ocean Dove is available worldwide, direct from the publishers (troubador.co.uk), from all the Amazon sites as a kindle or as a book, and from the main mail-order sites. When the book shops are open again, it will also be available in the High Street.

If you could visit any place in the world to give you inspiration for your next book, where would you go and why?

It would have to be the Sahel – across Chad, Niger and Mali. It’s been off limits for too long now, too dangerous. One day I hope to go back there. It’s a region where anything is possible, and I can’t imagine anyone (a writer) could go there and not come back inspired!

Copyright © Linda Hobden

Personal now – what outfits and shoes would you normally be found wearing?

Now you’re talking. I love clothes!  And sorry, this interview could go on a bit … My daily wear would be jeans, unadulterated Levi 501s please. And I like dressing up. People shine when they’ve made the effort.

Do you have any favourite shops or online sites?

Favourites? Not really any more, sadly. The High Street’s so samey now. I pick and choose carefully, perhaps in a vintage shop down a side street, a charity shop, or even a TK Maxx where some oddball but well made things pop up from time to time. I also like to pick up eclectic stuff when I’m overseas.   

What’s next on your clothes/shoe wish list?

What’s next? I’ve a hankering for a really good black cashmere cardigan. Yeah, yeah, cardie, I hear you … But I’ll have to save up, though it will last and still look perfect in ten or twenty years. Buying cheap is a false economy anyway.

Boots or Shoes? 

I’m particular about shoes and boots. Firstly, they must be strong and practical, but stylish. Secondly, they have to be well made, that’s traditionally made, so a proper cobbler can maintain them over many years. I’ve got shoes and boots that have been with me for twenty or so years. I can’t abide flimsy footwear. It must be stout, a firm foundation to stand in, to run in, to get out of trouble in, should it arise. And here I hasten to add the best way out of trouble is tact, diplomacy and a smile. But wafer thin slip-ons are just not for me … I have boots for just mooching around in, boots for walking, a good old pair of DMs, and boots for motor biking – ex German army paratroop boots that are maybe thirty years old and still good for another thirty. Shoes are much the same; classic, sometimes with a twist, Oxfords, a bit of brogue, even monks, but always traditionally and heavily constructed.

LINKS 

For pinning later.

www.carlosluxul.com
https://twitter.com/CarlosLuxul  or @CarlosLuxul

https://facebook.com/CarlosLuxul/

https://www.troubador.co.uk/bookshop/crime-and-thrillers/the-ocean-dove/

Thanks Carlos ! I didn’t have you down as a shoe connoisseur – have you discovered the shoes by Jeffrey West? Check them out when you’re next in London. You won’t be disappointed.

Linda x

All photographs have been published with kind permission by Carlos Luxul & Linda Hobden (where marked)
Thank you also to Ben Cameron of Cameron Publishing for the copy of Ocean Dove.

© 2020, Linda. All rights reserved.

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